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Retain Truckers with Driver Managers

September 4, 2019
driver managers

A driver manager can be a great resource to retain truckers. Often, complaints from drivers stem from not enough pay, or poor working conditions, in addition to lack of respect.

Therefore, the position of a driver manager is important. While the same respect should be given to drivers with concerns, the reality is, driver managers deal with corporate the most. Consequently, the results are different.

Therefore, we’ve compiled a few ways driver managers can help you retain good drivers.

#1. Treat Drivers as Consumers

Furthermore, it’s important to understand that drivers are core customers, and are equally as important as your external customers. A driver manager who possesses great customer service is essential to maintaining good drivers. Additionally, those who can handle the most demanding concerns and complaints from customers are also able to solve the complaints of their drivers more effectively.  

#2. Cultivate a Low-Stress Atmosphere

Moreover, if the leader is stressed, then so will its followers. In the case of the trucking industry, when the driver manager is overwhelmed, then it’s going to show through the interactions with their drivers. Try less yelling, and more communicating. When drivers are treated with respect, they tend to last longer.

#3. Hire Experienced Driver Managers

Additionally, utilizing senior driver managers who have the experience to give less-experienced staff advice on how to handle conflicts is key. Furthermore, qualified driver managers can also act as a middleman before issues hit the operations manager. They have the power to interject before matters get worse, and retain truckers.  

In brief, driver managers can truly serve as a great sounding board for drivers. However, it is also important to note that managers should never be overwhelmed with the number of drivers they manage either. Somewhere between 35 to 45 drivers for one manager is good. Anything more, personal connections are lost.  Afterall, a happy manager leads to happy drivers.

Would you agree? Comment below.

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